2013 Nissan Rogue: Genuine because of course it is

first_imgAURORA | There’s a 47 percent chance the car sitting in your driveway right now is a crossover.If you do own a crossover, there’s a 67 percent chance you own a dog too.2013 Nissan RogueIf you own both aforementioned dog and crossover, there’s a 83 percent chance it’s a sporting breed as far as the American Kennel Association is concerned, i.e. retriever, spaniel or some other water dog.There’s also 100 percent chance that’s all totally made up.The point however, should not be lost. Crossovers used to have jurisdiction only in high school parking lots. Safe, but not too big and thoroughly unexciting — like second period study hall.The Nissan Rogue was unleashed into that world a few years ago.Keen followers of the automotive world will know that many good cars — nay great cars, were not born from good ideas. Pony cars exist today because designers hadn’t heard of creativity in the 1960s; the DMC-12 existed because John DeLorean lost touch with reality and old man Enzo’s love affair and constant emulation of anything with two X chromosomes is the only reason I want a Ferrari. Or a date. I forget.I’m drifting. Back to the Rogue.Here’s an immutable law of carmaking: If it sells well, make one bigger or make one smaller. If possible, do both. If impossible, make possible.For Nissan, it was the success of the Murano that led to the Rogue. Pure, plain and simple. And it was the almost unilateral acceptance of the crossover one day, say, back in 2007 (we’ll say June 19 for no particular reason at all) that led to the success of them all.Now, the Rogue is the Swiss Army-everything answer for Nissan and is in almost just as many pockets. But it didn’t come without effort.How can you pack utility and 126 cubic feet of interior space for under $23,000 in something that doesn’t look, drive and smell like a dumpster?Good question. The tale of the tape could provide some insight as to that answer.For starters, the Rogue needs only 105 inches of wheelbase for all that interior space. That’s a small shadow to cast, but as a result, you don’t need a big motor to get it running.The Rogue’s mill is a frugal 2.5-liter four-cylinder that produces 170 horsepower that can aptly move its 3,000 lbs. curb weight in exurban duty with occasional inclement weather. If you’re looking for a six, you’re missing the point.Available in either front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive, Nissan planted the Rogue firmly in its powertrain wheelhouse by bestowing it with the option to move any of the four corners. The Rogue’s all-wheel drive, available on any trim package at any level — a smart move — adds $1,300 to the final sticker price and is well worth it for buyers that haven’t felt the mythical hand of global warming yet, i.e. snowy states.The Rogue exudes approachability that I do not. The eager and enthusiastic exterior is complemented in the way the Rogue handles in everyday driving.Stamp on the throttle and it wails. Wrench the stereo to full blast, drop the windows and give everyone on the road a free concert. The Rogue is the perfect friend sometimes: Accommodating, yielding and without judgment.And like a good friend, the Rogue takes care of what you don’t want to. Over-cook the wheel and it tempers your unnecessary exuberance with the unembarrassing, standard Vehicle Dynamic Control and Traction Control System features.There’s a good chance that the Rogue is a better nanny most times than Mary Poppins could have ever been.And there’s a need for those right now.Because, in every car-guy or car-gal’s heart, they know: packing a wrench for a grocery store trip isn’t fun all the time. Roasting Pirellis every day is another word for wasting money. Packing gear and friends in something together is useful and fun for weekends because of course is it.The next generation knows it. Sometimes it’s not so much about arriving in style as it is about arriving in the first place.We’re social animals that crave stability at some level, and the Rogue delivers it.It ticks the right marks: affordable, approachable and almost always applicable.If only the Rogue shook its leg when you scratched it behind the mirrors.Then you might even consider letting it sleep in the bed with you. Aaron Cole is a syndicated auto columnist. He knows he’s wrong, but he’d rather hear it from you. Reach him at aaron.m.cole@gmail.comlast_img read more

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Seniors set to plant garden for butterflies

first_imgThe start of Denver’s butterfly season has run several weeks later than normal due to the unseasonably raw spring. A group of people with Alzheimer’s will help boost the display of the colorful creatures when they plant a garden at 10 a.m. Monday, June 15 at Chelsea Place, 14055 E. Quincy Ave. in Aurora, with assistance from volunteers and staff from the Butterfly Pavilion.“We had a very cool, wet May and that delayed the butterflies,” said Amy Yarger, horticulture director for the Butterfly Pavilion. “Normally, we would have had a lot more by now. We should start seeing them in greater numbers around the time we plant the garden at Chelsea Place.”About 10 residents of Chelsea Place, which cares for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, will work alongside the Butterfly Pavilion team to plant blanket flower, bee balm, penstemon and milkweed — all native to the area and appetizing to butterflies — in a raised bed in the community’s courtyard.It will be a familiar activity for those who have always loved gardening and for several who grew up on farms. In coming weeks, they will watch for two-tailed swallowtail, clouded sulphur and monarch butterflies to discover the new garden and start flitting about. The residents also will receive kits to grow their own butterflies.“Putting the plants into the flowerbed and working alongside others with a love of nature will be energizing for our residents,” said Cecille Partee, community relations director for Chelsea Place. “This is a wonderful way to keep them connected to the greater world around them and to stir long-term memories of an activity, textures and scents that have been important in their lives.”last_img read more

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Drug might help breast cancer patients avoid heart damage

first_img Cancer survivor Christine Ells walks back to her classroom at Quincy High School in Quincy, Mass., Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Ells, 36, a teacher in the Boston suburb of Quincy, developed a heart rhythm problem from several drugs she was given to treat the breast cancer she was diagnosed with at age 27. Certain cancer drugs, such as Herceptin and doxorubicin, sold as Adriamycin and other brands, can hurt the heart’s ability to pump, and lead to heart failure. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) ORLANDO, Fla. | Many cancer treatments have a dark side — they can damage the heart. New research suggests this risk might be lowered in women with breast tumors if they take a heart drug as a preventive measure during their cancer care.If confirmed in wider testing, this could improve care for thousands of breast cancer patients in the U.S. alone each year, plus other women and some men who also get these treatments for other types of cancer.As it stands now, cancer patients are referred to cardiologists after certain cancer drugs or radiation treatments have already weakened their hearts. Special clinics are springing up in hospitals to take care of the growing number of cancer survivors with this problem. Cancer survivor Christine Ells embraces her twenty-month-old son Jameson after arriving home from work in Whitman, Mass., Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Ells, 36, a teacher in the Boston suburb of Quincy, developed a heart rhythm problem from several drugs she was given to treat the breast cancer she was diagnosed with at age 27. Certain cancer drugs, such as Herceptin and doxorubicin, sold as Adriamycin and other brands, can hurt the heart’s ability to pump, and lead to heart failure. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Cancer survivor Christine Ells jokes with her 20-month-old son, Jameson, while he eats a snack, after arriving home from work in Whitman, Mass., Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Ells, 36, a teacher in the Boston suburb of Quincy, developed a heart rhythm problem from several drugs she was given to treat the breast cancer she was diagnosed with at age 27. Certain cancer drugs, such as Herceptin and doxorubicin, sold as Adriamycin and other brands, can hurt the heart’s ability to pump, and lead to heart failure. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) “If you wait until the disease has occurred, it may be too late” to do much good, said Dr. Javid Moslehi, who heads one such specialty clinic at Vanderbilt University. “We in the cardiology community have to do a better job of preventing cardiac disease rather than jumping in” after damage has occurred.He had no role in the new study, which was done in Norway. Results were discussed Wednesday at an American Heart Association conference in Orlando.Radiation treatments can harm arteries, making them prone to harden and clog and cause a heart attack. It also can cause valve or rhythm troubles. Certain cancer drugs, such as Herceptin and doxorubicin, sold as Adriamycin and other brands, can hurt the heart’s ability to pump, and lead to heart failure.“We give poison with a purpose,” because it fights cancer, but heart problems can be “one of the dark sides of that,” said Dr. Ann Partridge, a breast cancer specialist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.One of her patients, Christine Ells, 36, a teacher in the Boston suburb of Quincy, developed a heart rhythm problem from several drugs she was given to treat the breast cancer she was diagnosed with at age 27.“The risks of these drugs are crazy,” she said, but “it was more important to cure my cancer.”The new study aimed to prevent cardiac side effects. Led by Dr. Geeta Gulati of Akershus University Hospital in Lorenskog, Norway, it involved 120 women with early-stage breast cancer and tested two drugs long used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure — candesartan and metoprolol. The drugs are available as generics and cost less than a dollar a day.Women were given one or both drugs or dummy pills, and their hearts’ pumping capacity was assessed at various time points with MRI scans.Heart damage worsened in the group on dummy pills. Metoprolol did not prevent heart decline but candesartan did, although the benefit was small — an improvement of 2 percent to 3 percent in pumping strength compared to the placebo group.“The major issue is, the effect was very modest,” so whether that prevents heart failure from developing down the road is not known, said Dr. Bonnie Ky, a cardio-oncology specialist at the University of Pennsylvania.It’s also not known whether things get better or worse over time, or whether a different drug in the same class would work better.Still, it’s a first.As cancer patients are living longer, the risk of dying from heart problems actually exceeds that of cancer, so it’s important to prevent damage, Ky said.The University of South Florida has a federally funded study underway, testing drugs to prevent heart failure for women on Herceptin, that may help answer some questions.Meanwhile, some doctors already are considering this tactic, especially in women taking drugs known to harm the heart or who already have some risk factors for heart problems.“I get calls from the oncologists saying, ‘she’s at high risk, why don’t we just start it?’” Dr. David Slosky, a cardiologist at Vanderbilt, said of preventive treatment.“They’re pretty benign,” he said of the heart drugs the study tested. “The threshold, if somebody’s got a high-risk cancer, will be pretty low” to use them preventively, he said.Online:Heart advice for cancer patients: https://www.cardio-onc.orgMarilynn Marchione can be followed at https://twitter.com/MMarchioneAPlast_img read more

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Poet and novelist Lucia Perillo dies at 58

first_imgOLYMPIA, Wash. | Lucia Perillo, an award-winning author and Pulitzer Prize finalist, has died at the age of 58.The publishing company Copper Canyon Press reported Sunday that Perillo passed away Oct. 16 in Olympia. The cause of her death was not immediately known.Perillo authored several collections of poetry, including “Inseminating the Elephant” in 2009, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry from the Library of Congress.The MacArthur Genius Fellow was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1988 and published her first book a year later, entitled “Dangerous Life.”Perillo was a professor at Syracuse University, where she received her master of arts in English. She also taught at Southern Illinois University, Saint Martin’s University, and in the Warren Wilson College master of fine arts program.last_img read more

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Summer Movie Preview: ‘Deadpool 2’ is about kindness (truly)

first_img This image released by 20th Century Fox shows a scene from “Deadpool 2,” premiering on May 18. (20th Century Fox via AP) 1 of 2 AP: The first is so wild and jam-packed with everything. Did you hold anything back or save anything thinking that there would be a sequel?REYNOLDS: Oh my God we put everything out there. We had no pie in the sky notions that we would be guaranteed a sequel after this. But (screenwriters) Rhett (Reese) and Paul (Wernick) and I had been working together for, God, coming on eight years now. We worked on the first script together for years before it even got close to being greenlit and while shooting the first film, we were already coming up with a story for the second one. But at the time it wasn’t something that was a reality; it was just something we loved. I think that at the end of the day the driving force behind “Deadpool” is that there are a great number of people who absolutely love every aspect of it. I think that’s what translates to the audience. There is an authentic joy and love for what we’re doing and we have so much fun doing it and you can’t help but feel that through the screen.AP: Is there anything that is off-limits for Deadpool?REYNOLDS: Not really. To make a great rated-R comic book film you’ve definitely got to push the boundaries a little bit and we leave that to the editing process to figure out what we want to keep and what we don’t. Tone is so critical in these movies and at the heart of “Deadpool” is always a very emotional story. You have to circle around that before you think about comedy bits or trying to incite reactions or that sort of thing. So “Deadpool 2” is really, at its core, about how one act of kindness can change the world. It’s sort of a nature versus nurture story at its heart and that’s critical to the film as a whole. Then you can model which sort of comedic set pieces you want around that. But at the end of the day it’s got to be an engrossing story and that’s the thing that we were most focused on from the get-go.AP: That’s very sweet and sincere! And here I was thinking the most sincere thing about “Deadpool” was the Wikipedia page. Everything else from the logline to the marketing leans into the irreverence of it.REYNOLDS: Deadpool at his heart is sort of like a child. Like, yeah he can be vulgar, yeah he can act out but at its core there is a certain innocence to other aspects of him and I think that is something that’s really important with the character. He sees the world through the prism of a child’s eyes sometimes and that’s also why he’s tempestuous and obnoxious and misguided so much of the time too.AP: How are you feeling leading up to the release? With a summer date, it’s playing in the big leagues now.REYNOLDS: For us that’s been a dream come true as well. Having “Deadpool” positioned as a summer movie gives us a little more license to go a bit bigger, but at the same time our budgets are not comparable to some of the big Marvel movies. But necessity is the mother of invention so the less we have, the more creative we have to get. It has all the same principles and tenets as the first film which Dave Leitch loved and really wanted to honor, but at the same time there’s a different flavor to it as well because Dave likes to keep major action in the lens as opposed to relying more on CGI.It still has this kind of down and dirty feel, which I love, but it also has so many elements that I think are going to blow audiences away and surprise people. I’m super excited about it. Right now we’re just focusing in on the marketing campaign which for “Deadpool” is always to a certain degree an extension of the film itself. We get to have as much fun with the marketing as we do with the actual shooting of the movie. I’m excited to put out some of the things we have ready to go in terms of the marketing.AP: From the studio behind “27 Dresses,” right?REYNOLDS: Absolutely, yeah. If you loved “Alvin and the Chipmunks,” you are going to love “Deadpool.”AP: Do you feel like this has to do better than the first to be a success?REYNOLDS: I don’t really think about it like that. I’d be naive to not pay attention to some of the biz part of the showbiz but I know that the movie is made at a budget that makes it pretty reasonable for all parties involved and when we keep the budget down, the studio gives us a lot more play and leeway to do the things that we want to do and that’s always great. So, no, I don’t think it has to do better, necessarily.AP: Will the film honor Joi Harris in any way? (Stuntwoman Joi Harris died while filming “Deadpool 2” ).REYNOLDS: Oh absolutely yeah.AP: Are you and the producers going to address T.J. Miller at all, since he’s been in the headlines recently ?REYNOLDS: You know, I think you’ve got to ask T.J. Miller about that, he’s an expert on T.J. Miller.Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr FILE – In this March 22, 2018 file photo, Ryan Reynolds attends a special screening of “Final Portrait” in New York. Reynolds stars in “Deadpool 2,” in theaters on May 18. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File) LOS ANGELES | After being stuck in development for over a decade, “Deadpool” broke box-office records and shattered preconceived notions about what an R-rated superhero movie could do when it debuted in February 2016. Now the foul-mouthed mercenary is back with a sequel that’s gearing up to play in the big leagues — the summer movie season.Star and producer Ryan Reynolds spoke to The Associated Press about what to expect when Deadpool returns to theaters on May 18.Remarks have been edited for clarity and brevity.last_img read more

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Congo park ranger tells of taking viral selfie with gorillas

first_imgLONDON | A park ranger in Congo has described how he captured a selfie with two gorillas that went viral.Mathieu Shamavu, a ranger at Virunga National Park in eastern Congo, said he was checking his phone when he noticed two female orphaned gorillas, Ndakazi and Ndeze, mimicking his movements, so he took a picture with them.In this image taken on Thursday April 18, 2019, Mathieu Shamavu, a ranger and caretaker at the Senkwekwe Center for Orphaned Mountain Gorillas poses for a photo with female orphaned gorillas Ndakazi and Ndeze at the the Senkwekwe Center for Orphaned Mountain Gorillas in Virunga National Park, eastern Congo. Shamavu has described to the Associated Press how he was checking his phone when he noticed two female orphaned gorillas, Ndakazi and Ndeze, mimicking his movements, so he took a picture with them. (Mathieu Shamavu/Virunga National Park via AP)The gorillas look as if they’re posing for the camera and when Shamavu posted the picture on social media on Saturday it quickly clocked up thousands of likes and comments.According to rangers at the sanctuary, Ndakazi and Ndeze were orphaned 12 years ago when their families were killed by poachers.They were the first orphans to be cared for at the center, which according to Virunga park’s management, is the only place in the world dedicated to the care of orphaned mountain gorillas.As the gorillas arrive in the sanctuary at a young age, they learn from their caretakers, said Shamavu.“In terms of behavior, they like to mimic everything that is happening (around them), everything we do,” Shamavu told The Associated Press.He said the caretakers at Senkwekwe Mountain Gorilla Orphanage Center try to give the animals as much access as possible to their natural environment, but they inevitably exhibit “almost the same behavior as humans.”Senkwekwe is named after one of the wild silverback gorillas that was killed in Virunga in 2007.The orphans need constant care, so the rangers live nearby and spend their days with them – feeding them, playing with them, keeping them company.“Gorilla caretakers with those gorilla orphans, we are the same family,” said head caretaker Andre Bauma.He said without their own relatives nearby, the gorillas treat the rangers as their family.“They know we are their mum. They are a member of the family. We are their friends,” said Bauma.Virunga is billed as Africa’s most biodiverse national park, spanning tropical forests, snow-peaked mountains and active volcanoes.It’s also one of the last bastions of wild mountain gorilla populations. Parks in the mountains of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda have the last remaining mountain gorillas in their natural habitat.But it’s in eastern Congo, an area that has suffered from years of armed conflict.Virunga’s management has had to take extraordinary measures to keep its visitors safe from the on-and-off fighting in the region – protecting them with a highly trained guard of elite rangers and sniffer dogs, and working closely with communities surrounding the park.After a park ranger was killed by gunmen and three foreign tourists were briefly held captive, the park closed until it could secure the safety of visitors. It reopened in mid-February this year.But all this costs money, and the state park says it wouldn’t be able to survive without private donations from visitors.Virunga’s management hopes the viral gorilla selfie will help boost the park’s profile, and encourage more people to contribute to the vital work of conserving the mountain gorillas and their unique natural habitat.last_img read more

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STEAM for All 2019 speakers

first_imgLawrence H. Kuznetz, PhDA space career revisitedLawrence H. KuznetzLawrence H. Kuznetz was at Mission Control on the night of the Moon Landing. Kuznetz was also a guest on the Johnny Carson Tonight Show introducing the Space Shuttle to the American people. This life-long scientist and inventor also had NASA ask him to spy on its leading shuttle contractor — only later to be spied upon by the KGB.  Wild? There’s more. He was personal and professional friends with astronauts who was stunned to see them perish before his eyes in spacecraft he helped build.Kuznetz will share his stunning tenure and career with the audience as he revisits his expose about the dangerous shortcomings of NASA. It was a publication that became the subject of Congressional oversight. Kuznetz recalls how he took on the hierarchy of NASA, Congress and the White House to save and protect the Space Shuttle from being dismantled and carted off to museums before its time. These are just some of the stories Kuznetz, brings to the forefront at STEAMfest for all and Apollopalooza.— Submitted by WingsSue Bean and Barbara Cernan ButlerA view of space from homeSue Bean will share her personal stories of her family life and what it was like being the wife of one of the 12 men to walk on the moon.  Alongside her best friend, Barbara Cernan Butler, they will enlighten you to the many adventures, experiences and special moments they shared in the years spent in Houston and at NASA.Sue Bean and Barbara Cernan ButlerSue Bean was born and raised in Dallas, Texas. She graduated from The University of Texas in Austin with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education. It was here she met her future husband, Alan Bean. They were married in April 1955 in Dallas after Alan received his Navy Commission. They resided at several Navy bases while Alan was a test pilot and Sue taught elementary school, before finally settling in Houston when he was selected to NASA in January of 1964. Alan was a member of the backup crew for Apollo IX, Lunar Module Pilot and 4th man to walk on the moon on Apollo 12, and commander of Skylab 3. Sue and Alan were married for 21 years. They divorced in 1977. Sue returned to teaching in Houston until retiring in 1990.Butler is a native Texan, born in Corpus Christi, Texas on March 29, 1938 and raised in the Houston area. In 1959, Barbara joined Continental Airlines, now United Airlines, as a flight attendant and was transferred to Los Angeles, California. It was here she met a young naval aviator, Eugene Cernan, and they were married in May 1961 and lived in San Diego, California where he was stationed. Gene was accepted to Post Graduate school in Monterrey, California where they called home for 18 months before he was selected for the Manned Space Program in 1963. Barbara and Gene then returned home to Houston in January 1964 and began their lives in the Space program.— Submitted by WingsAuthor Laura RoettigerAliana Reaches for the MoonLaura Roettiger is the author of Aliana Reaches for the Moon and has enjoyed working with children ever since she was no longer considered a child herself. She was a reading specialist and elementary teacher in Chicago, IL before moving to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado where she worked in Environmental Education and is now a mentor for reading and writing at a STEM school. Her superpower is encouraging curiosity in children and letting them know she believes in them. She has three children of her own whose curiosity and creativity led all of them into STEM related professions.— Submitted by WingsIn partnership with Sentinel Colorado, Wings Over the Rockies is pleased to host STEAM For All Festival.Wings spokesman Ben Theune said the event partners with fellow institutions, industry-leaders and experts in STEAM to bring attendees a comprehensive overview of how to get involved in STEAM. Much more than that, the even helps participants understand what STEAM is, how these fields can be used for personal and career development and, most importantly, how to have fun in these fields.Engage with the following leaders in STEAM:• Metropolitan State University of Denver• Bel-Rea• Independent Electrical Contractors Rocky Mountain• Young Americans Bank•Colorado Skies Academy• Girls Who Code• Wells Fargo• Spartan College• City of Aurora• Girls Scouts of Colorado• QuestBotics• United Launch Alliance• National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationlast_img read more

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Man overboard

first_imgThe Backyard Golf SocietyNot for the first time, the Backyard Golf Society report relates more to our players’ non-golfing activities than the actual game.  Foos yer Doos Cowe took the gold medal this week, rocking up late and still slightly inebriated, making it to the 6th green with 6 blobs (although he is adamant it was the 9th), walking off for a coldie and failing to re-emerge for about 3 hours.  After finally taking a shower he emerged belt-less, baring all, and chucked an empty wallet at the course manager before sleeping for 14 hours.  Legend! After that show the golf took second place but the winner of the main competition was The Biss, still retired but looking out.  The near-pin went to frequent winner Jimmy ‘2 Stone’ and the skins were another triumph for The Biss, winning 8 in all while The Quiet Man won 4, Danny the Scumberger Kid took 2 and the final 4 holes were rolled over to next week.The Bliss (3rd left) celebrates his golfing victory with the staff at Blue Sky Bar. Golden Trowel’s Boyfriend has volunteered to take the first known flight with Air Sri Lanka to London so we will be referring to him as the Tamil Tabby until he returns.  Based on reports of his eating habits he could actually fly there without a plane if he tried.With Michelle suffering another bout of gout we will be low on numbers for a while but that will please The Quiet Man, down the road quicker every Friday.last_img read more

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Duncan delight at Crystal Bay

first_imgPJ’s and Soi Khanoi Golf GroupWe had two great outings last week: Tuesday saw us at Eastern Star with our group numbers growing as the new prime season approaches.  Conditions at the course were superb with Willy Nachbur (H/cap 23) the winner again with 34 points and second place going to Ray Bridgeman (24) with 31points after beating Mike J. (15) on count-back. Ancillary prizes were won by Dave Clamp, Mike Jackson, Rusty Archibald, and Willy Nachbur.On Thursday we were at Crystal Bay with a good turnout and we found conditions to be perfect for golf – no blazing sun and only a slight wind (unlike it has been for the past few weeks).The course was in great shape and it showed by our winner’s score as Neil Duncan (16) took top spot with 41 points.  Second place went to John (Raddo) Roddis (11) some way back on 33 points with Ray Bridgeman (24) taking third on 31.  Only Ray’s second time out and his second time to finish in the money!Technical awards went to Dennis Dunkley, Neil Duncan, Mike J, and longest putt was claimed by Peter Bohr.Note:  Anyone in the Soi Khanoi area is most welcome to join our group; you can either sign up at PJ’s Pool Bar on Soi Khanoi or call Mike Jackson at 087 933 6652 or Dave Clamp at 080 102 8913.  We have two great venues every Tuesday and Thursday.last_img read more

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Rajah rules the Valley

first_img2nd Pat Regan (12) 35ptsB Flight1st Jean LaRoche (18) 36pts2nd Colin Davis (17) 35pts It was a somewhat smaller field than normal for Sunday, due in part to the society ranks returning late from the very successful Hau Hin trip.Chaten ‘the Rajah’ Patel continued his fine run of form as he led the field home with a best on the day and man of the match 37 points.  Irishman Pat Reagan, also on a run of good form, filled the flight after gaining a count back verdict over Peter ‘the right Honorable’ LeNoury.  Peter wasn’t too disappointed as he picked the biggest bag of loot by carding the only 2 of the day.Chaten Patel (right) with Colin Davis.In B Flight, French-Canadian Jean LaRoche showed his mettle as he netted 36 points to clear the ‘Donkey’ and Barry ‘the Boot’ Copestake by a single digit.  The ‘Donkey’, as he so often does, gave nothing away as he booted Barry of the podium.Monday, April 22, Mountain Shadow – Stableford1st Freddy Starbeck (15) 33pts2nd Brian Dunbar (10) 32pts3rd Roy Johnson (20) 31ptsA perennial favourite, Mountain Shadow was the site of Monday’s outing.  Freddy ‘the Viking’ Starbeck lived up to his handle as bullied his way to the top podium spot with his rather modest 33 point victory.  Brian Dunbar took the silver a shot in arrears but made up for his disappointment by posting the day’s only 2.Roy Johnson edged a resurgent JP Maffray on count back as he closed the flight, leaving JP with only a “bad luck son” from the remaining players.Wednesday, April 24, Bangpra – StablefordA Flight1st Leslie Cobban (10) 34pts2nd Brian Dunbar (12) 32pts3rd Jon Haugen (9) 30ptsB Flight1st Colin Davis (17) 31pts2nd Jimmy Day (18) 29pts3rd John Foote (17) 26ptsC Flight1st Esara Duangsri (36) 34pts2nd Marlene Prudden (23) 32pts3rd Tom Gorey (22) 32ptsWith the society back to near full strength, a good sized field took on the marauding monkeys and the Bangpra layout.The ‘Donkey’ showed why he put the well-conditioned Bangpra on the monthly calendar as he cantered round the course to win B Flight with 31 points, just enough – hence the moniker.  Ireland’s Jimmy ‘good’ Day nabbed the silver a couple of shots back as Aussie John Foote was bewildered to see his 26 points good for the bronze.John and his other half Lyn are long time regulars with the society and are always a welcome addition.  Not many people know what Lyn’s maiden name is.  A clue: when the two were married, John added one of these, while Lyn gained four.  The answer comes from a no less reliable source than the Theobalds; Lyn’s maiden name was “Toe”, no kidding!  Welcome back John and Lyn.Anyway there was a co-man of the match in the premier flight and a co-lady of the match in C Flight.  Leslie Cobban stood atop the A Flight with 34 points and both 2’s on the day.  Leslie was two clear of the man on form, Brian Dunbar, and a further two of Jon Hagen.C Flight produced the co-lady of the match as Esara Duangsri struck again with 34 points.  The other Aussie couple playing with us today, Brian and Marlene Prudden, were in the coin as Marlene picked up the silver with a count back victory of Irishman Tom Gory.Friday, April 26, Greenwood – StablefordA Flight1st Lawrie McBride (16) 36pts2nd Colin Davis (17) 35pts3rd Terry Mangan (19) 34ptsB Flight1st Martin Allard (25) 40pts2nd Mark Williams (20) 38pts3rd Stuart Brown (25) 36ptsIt was back to Greenwood on Friday and the day’s task was the A&B layouts.  Martin Allard left little question about who was man of the match as he shot a blistering 40pts in B Flight, that was 2 clear of Mark Williams and a further 2 from Stuart Brown.In the top boys’ flight, Lawrie McBride continued his fine play to take the top spot with a solid even par round to the Donkey’s silver winning 35 points.  Terry ‘pork chop’ Mangan, always there or there abouts, filled the flight a further shot in arrears.Colin Davethell scooped the 2’s pot with a brace.Note:  Lewiinski’s is situated on Pattaya Land Soi 1, Beach Road Soi 13/3 near to Walking Street.  Anyone wishing to play with us just pop in and add your name to the list or call Colin on 089 826 0764. Transport is provided. PSC golf from Lewiinski’s Golf SocietySunday, April 21, Green Valley – StablefordA Flight1st Chaten Patel (13) 37ptslast_img read more

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